News

UPDATED: VIDEO AND AUDIO PODCASTS NOW AVAILABLE FOR PUBLIC TALK: IS THERE BUDDHISM WITHOUT REBIRTH?

Published on 14 July 2015

The UC Berkeley Center for Buddhist Studies

in partnership with Khyentse Foundation and Siddhartha’s Intent - Western Door 

Jointly present:
Is There Buddhism Without Rebirth?

A Day-Long Public Talk With
Dzongsar Jamyang Khyentse Rinpoche
(With Chinese Translation)

Wheeler Auditorium, University of California, Berkeley

Sunday, July 19, 2015

The sessions were livestreamed in 3 sessions. The time of each session was PDT time. 

UPDATED: The talk as a livestream is now available as a free video and podcast.

Go here to view - http://www.siddharthasintent.org/resources/podcasts/video-podcasts/is-there-buddhism-without-rebirth/

Go here to listen - http://www.siddharthasintent.org/resources/podcasts/audio-podcasts/is-there-buddhism-without-rebirth/

A donation will help us continue to make these teachings available  

10:00 a.m - 12 pm First Session:

12-1:30 p.m. Lunch Break

1:30-3:00 p.m. Second Session:

3:00 - 3:15 pm Break

3:15-4 pm  Third Session:

 

Is There Buddhism Without Rebirth?

In classrooms and dharma centers alike, westerners encountering Buddhism for the first time must come to terms with the widespread Buddhist belief in rebirth. For many, death represents the ultimate unknown, the ultimate lesson in impermanence. Why then, they ask themselves, should they believe Buddhism’s answer to this perplexing question, any more than the answers of other religions that teach eternal salvation in heaven or damnation in hell? Does rebirth fall into the category of “cultural trappings,” such as sexist views of women, certain ritual forms, and belief in traditional Indian cosmology—cultural accretions that can be dismissed as extraneous to the “core teachings” of Buddhism?

Many westerners view belief in reincarnation as simply irrelevant to their engagement in Buddhism. Yet for centuries, Buddhist texts have been filled with warnings about heretics who deny the existence of rebirth and the ethical ramifications of such views. How are we to understand such warnings? And if we discard all such “cultural trappings” as irrelevant to what is essential about Buddhism, what is left of a religion that teaches the lack of any independent essence?